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University Writing Program > Course Information > Course Descriptions > UWP 102L - Writing in the Disciplines: Film Studies
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UWP 102L - Writing in the Disciplines: Film Studies

(formerly UWP 102A)


  1. CATALOG DESCRIPTION:
    UWP102L Writing in the Disciplines: Film Studies (4) Lecture/discussion--3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 1 or English 3 or the equivalent and upper division standing. Open to majors and minors or to students concurrently enrolled in an upper division course in Film Studies, Technocultural Studies, English, American Studies, or any other upper division course that includes the analysis and understanding of film as a medium. Advanced instruction in writing about film and practice in effective styles of communication. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 102A in the same academic field. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WE.
  2. SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENTS:
    Understanding the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing. Analyzing typical rhetorical situations within the discipline of film studies. Analyzing the needs, interests, and abilities of various audiences, including film scholars and critics, professionals in related disciplines (cultural studies, media studies, literature and languages), and the public. Adapting one's writing to the situation. Ascertaining the forms of discourse appropriate to film studies, such as critical commentary, review, formal analysis, theoretical analysis, and historical analysis. Finding and using appropriate sources from various media. Developing an effective academic and professional writing style within the context of the discipline. Documenting sources using approved forms. Writing clear and focused sentences; using verbs effectively. Writing coherent paragraphs. Using the terminology of film style and film theory. 
  3. ILLUSTRATIVE READING:
    Texts will vary according to the instructor, but may include Timothy Corrigan's "A Short Guide to Writing About Film," James Monaco's "How to Read a Film," or an anthology such as Gerald Mast's "Film Theory and Criticism." Instructors might choose to assemble a course reader--reviews, historical essays, critical analyses--as an alternative or supplement to a text. Students will be required to view several full-length films.
  4. FINAL EXAMINATION REQUIREMENT:
  5. JUSTIFICATION OF UNITS:
    UWP 102L is a four-unit course. Three hours per week are lecture and discussion. An additional unit of credit is justified by the additional time students must devote to screening films, and--as with all upper-division UWP courses--by the significant amount of work that students must do outside of class time to plan, draft, and revise the 6000 or more words of required writing. In addition to this substantial written requirement, students will meet individually with the instructor for discussion and evaluation of their work. The estimated time of preparation of the writing assignments (research, consultation, drafting, revision) is thirty hours, an amount consistent with Carnegie Rule guidelines.
  6. POTENTIAL COURSE OVERLAP:
    This course does not overlap with any other courses. It is distinguished from other advanced composition courses by its focus on writing within the discipline of film studies; it is distinguished from upper division film studies courses by its emphasis on instruction in writing and by its broad overview of a variety of topics in film studies. Despite its overview of various issues in film studies, it will not be an introduction to film studies, and so will not overlap with Film Studies 1.
  7. GENERAL EDUCATION JUSTIFICATION:
    Writing experience: Grades will be based on the students' performance on in- and out-of-class writing assignments and on a final exam. Students will write a minimum of 6000 words; the number of assignments and the weight of each assignment will vary according to the instructor. Assignments may include the following types: a film review, a formal analysis of a scene, a comparison/contrast paper, a theoretical analysis, a research paper, a mixed-genre essay. All assignments will be graded on content and style. The instructor will thoroughly introduce each assignment using models of successful work as appropriate. Students will receive frequent feedback on drafts of assignments through instructor commentary, conferences, and peer response. Students will have frequent opportunity to revise drafts.
  8. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS:
    None

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